If you are poor now, you will be poor later; school does not get kids out of poverty. One reason we know this to be true is that schools systematically move poor kids from the classroom to the jail cell. But the other barrier to lifting kids out of poverty is that rich kids score high and poor kids score low, and this doesn’t change if you put a rich kid in a poor-kid school or vice versa. Read more

This is a guest post from Kim Bain. She  has three children.

I suck at budgeting and finances but I do know this: sending kids to school has costs. I’m not just talking about field trip money and new-Jordan’s-to-impress-the-ladies type costs.

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This is a guest post from Sarah Faulkner. She is a homeschooling mom in Washington state. She has five kids, ages 13, 11, 9, 5, and 2. That’s Sarah and her husband in the photo.

I don’t think homeschooling has made me poor, but it depends on who you ask.  For some strange reason I seem to have people in my life who feel like they must tell me how to live my life.  Over and over.  You would think after 9 years of homeschooling they would realize I’m not going to listen to them.  It always makes me wonder the intelligence I am speaking to when they lecture yet again.  Seriously, do you just not know me?  Why do you not shut up?
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This is a guest post from Erin Wetzel. She is a artist who lives in Tacoma WA and homeschools her daughter. You can connect with her on instagram @ekwetzel.

Matt was laid off in January. A few weeks ago, I wrote about how it was affecting us. And then to our surprise, Matt accepted a new job, a better job than his old one.
What a relief. Read more

This is a guest post from Erin Wetzel. She is a artist who lives in Tacoma WA (that’s her drawing). She homeschools her daughter. You can connect with her on instagram @ekwetzel.  

I’m going to go ahead and confess: we use food stamps.

It’s not fun living right above the poverty line. I’m ashamed that we can’t afford our basic needs. I’m tired of not having a phone and cutting my own hair and making all our meals at home. I’m tired of carefully asking the grandparents at Christmas if, instead of buying new toys, they’d help us pay for Phoebe’s ballet lessons. Read more

You know all those ads that say “Make $2000 a month from home!” They are not lying, but it’s a minimum wage job doing work on the phone that requires almost no skill except to sound like you live in the US.

Which is to say those jobs are terrible. Read more

It’s common for parents to say they have chosen to give up income when they began homeschooling.

I disagree—there is really no lost income, and here’s why: Read more

I hired my editor seven years ago when he sent an email out of the blue saying that he loves my blog and he’d like to edit my posts. I needed an editor. I was used to having an editor for everything I wrote and I couldn’t imagine writing without an editor on my blog. Read more

My youngest son loves a good shopping trip. Clothes. That’s his sweet spot. Shoes in a pinch. So when I’m at a loss as to how we will spend all the extra time we have in between cello lessons, I think, well, we can shop. Read more

In my career coaching life I have noticed many patterns that come up over and over again.

  • For example, many women who are 35 and unmarried have commitment issues.
  • Many men who are 45 and want coaching have a family with a burn rate that is on track to exceed their earning power.
  • First-generation immigrants in their 20s don’t have career problems as much as they have parent problems.

Now that I’ve been coaching people about how to start homeschooling, I’ve noticed a pattern there as well. And it surprises me: The most common struggle with homeschoolers is money. Specifically, many people I coach are a two-income family and would have to change to one income so one parent (mostly) could homeschool. Read more